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If you are considering a career in medicine, we hope that this website provides a helpful overview of the structure of medical education and training in Ireland, and the range of career options available to you as you progress and develop.

After completing your medical degree and internship, you will have a range of options which will allow you to focus on those areas of medicine which you are most interested in. There are 52 recognised medical specialties in Ireland, and in order to become a specialist in one or more of these areas, you will have to complete the necessary specialist training, which will be delivered by one of 13 recognised postgraduate medical training bodies (PGTBs).

How do I become a doctor?

If you are reading this website, there is a strong chance that you have already considered becoming a doctor. For students in Ireland, entry to medical school is administered through the Central Applications Office (CAO). The normal closing date for applications is February 1st. In addition to your performance in the Irish Leaving Certificate (or its equivalent), you will also be required to pass the Health Professions Admissions Test (HPAT). The closing date for 2017 applications is January 20th and the exam takes place on February 25th, further information is available from the CAO & HPAT websites. You can find other sources of information in relation to accessing medical degree courses on the ‘Disability Access Route to Education’ (DARE) & ‘Higher Education Access Route’ (HEAR) websites.

 Where can I study medicine in Ireland?

To learn more about the medical schools in Ireland, and entry to five or six year medical degree courses, visit the websites of the six medical schools:

Note: The duration of courses stated above may vary for each student. Some students may be exempt from the foundation year, based on their academic subjects and/or grades that they have achieved prior to admission. For students who don't benefit from this particular exemption, the duration of their degree course may increase by a year.

Note: The duration of courses stated above may vary for each student. Some students may be exempt from the foundation year, based on their academic subjects and/or grades that they have achieved prior to admission. For students who don't benefit from this particular exemption, the duration of their degree course may increase by a year.

Note: The duration of courses stated above may vary for each student. Some students may be exempt from the foundation year, based on their academic subjects and/or grades that they have achieved prior to admission. For students who don't benefit from this particular exemption, the duration of their degree course may increase by a year.

Who is responsible for ensuring the quality of my medical degree?

We are. Every medical degree programme delivered in Ireland is required to meet our standards, which are based upon the World Federation for Medical Education’s Global Standards for Quality Improvement in Medical Education (European Specifications). These standards set requirements for programmes, and for the medical schools delivering the programmes. Read more about our Quality Assurance

I am an international student - can I apply to Medical Schools in Ireland?

Yes - there may be additional entry requirements for international applicants. This is explained in each medical school’s prospectus, available on their websites. For a summary of the requirements please see the page on entry requirements